Tag Archives: superbadger

Mid-week Mexican Multimedia

Ay curumba!

This video was made by our Campaigns team for a hand-in of our Tearfund action on climate change from 10,000 UK supporters. We are asking Chris Huhne to listen to our concerns while he is in Mexico (if he comes back after the tuition fees vote that is!):

Badger Japanese Embassy to stop derailing the climate talks!

International badger alert!

As climate talks continue, there’s a danger that even the small steps of progress expected in Cancun will be derailed by Japan’s actions this week.

The Kyoto Protocol – the current agreement between 38 industrialised countries to tackle climate change – may need to be extended beyond its current shelf-life of 2012 until a fair, ambitious and binding global deal is agreed.

But Japan – on whose shores the Kyoto Protocol was signed – is arguing against extending it!

If the protocol is not extended soon we could enter a worrying few years with no global emissions reductions targets in place, which would be devastating for developing countries, and small island states in the case of already rising sea levels.

Since Japan hosted the conference where the Kyoto Protocol was signed, they should continue their climate leadership by committing to another set of emissions cuts targets in it.

We need to urge them to take an international lead by supporting the Kyoto Protocol and working constructively with other countries to push towards a global deal.

Please badger the Japanese Embassy in London to call on Japan to champion and not neglect the Kyoto Protocol! It’s so easy, make your voice heard and make a difference!

End of week one in Cancun: Good COP or Bad COP?

As the climate talks reach a half way point, everyone is starting to assess the negotiations and the progress that has been made.

It’s been a fairly frustrating week for Superbadger and the Tearfund team as we are seeing much more negativity that we would like. This year’s summit was being promoted as a ‘stepping stone’ for more significant progress during COP17 in South Africa next year, but so far the negotiations seem to be at a standstill, with many countries such as the US still taking the ‘nothing is agreed until everything is agreed’ approach, which is unhelpful.

Tearfund’s Head of Policy, Laura Webster, said, ‘We came into these talks hoping that the foundations for a fair global climate deal would be laid. Instead, we are at the half way point and there is still a disconnect between the urgent need to halt runaway climate change and the current pace of the negotiations.’

Let's play a little good COP, bad COP, shall we?

  • Good COP: Forestry talks have been progressing well according to Brazil’s ambassador for climate change, Sergio Serra, who hopes it will help fund safeguards to prevent further deforestation in the Amazon.
  • China have been cooperative in their domestic efforts in cutting emissions, regardless of what other countries are doing, which is fantastic for a developing country. However, they are being very secretive and not being the most constructive player in the negotiations themselves.
  • COP 16 is seeing strong leadership from Mexico, also a developing country, as they attempt to steer the negotiations through rocky waters.
  • In-between: The EU released a report on Fast Start Finance, as posted on the blog a few days ago, which outlined a proposal to inject some quick cash into a climate fund over the next few years, which is great to see. However, there are still some sticking points about where the money is coming from and going to – as a large proportion of the money is being channelled out of existing aid budgets instead of from innovative new sources. So, not bad, but also not good! However, they are speaking out positively on a second commitment period for the Kyoto Protocol, which is good news.
  • Bad COP: From the first day of negotiations, Japan have been openly opposed to a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, the first period of which was agreed upon by a number of countries back in 1997 and will end in 2012. Without a second commitment period, we could see little to no progress in cutting emissions, which would be devastating for developing countries who are hit hardest by climate change. Head over to the Superbadger Action page to badger the Japanese embassy to put pressure on Japan during these talks!
  • On Monday, Canada bagged all three Fossil of the Day ‘awards’, given out by NGOs to countries they feel have done the most to hamper international climate talks each day during the conference. Canada received these awards because after they killed a progressive climate change bill without even bothering to debate it, and failing to have any plan to meet its targets! Canada have been one of the biggest ‘blockers’ for any progress here in Cancun, so we’re hoping they will step up their game for week two, though they have said they cannot act on climate change until the US does!

It’s been a bit of a mixed bag of a week here at the talks, so what we really need for week two is positivity, and most of all a fair, ambitious and binding deal that will benefit developing countries and poor communities.

Tearfund also want to see more countries agreeing to a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol in 2012, because without it, the world could very easily see a sharp rise in global temperature towards a predicted 4 degrees above baseline, which would have devastating effects for all countries.

We are also hoping that the fact that progress may not happen during the Cancun talks, does not scupper the chances of getting a fair and adequate climate fund in place for developing countries.

Rich countries cannot continue to behave as though they are uninformed of the stark climate realities caused by of years of their industrialisation. As week two gets underway we must start to see more urgency.

‘Fast Start’…but is it a good start?

Over the next few days at the COP16 climate talks in Cancun, countries and country blocs are going to be making moves in the negotiations – these are expected to be small steps and no one is expecting anything ground breaking over the next few weeks (though we can hope and pray!). 

The first blog-worthy opening move has come from the EU – on Tuesday 30th November the EU launched a progress report on fast start finance (FSF) designed to help developing nations fight climate change and develop sustainably. Superbadger thinks this is a good start, and hopefully this will spur on other countries to make similar moves.

If only...

The report itself, though, seems a little vague on its figures. The EU has said it has channelled 2.2 million euros this year into this fast start scheme, but less than 50% of this amount is being allocated to helping developing countries adapt to the devastating effects of climate change. One thing it has made clear is that much of the money will be coming from existing aid budgets, which means that the poorest communities will actually not benefit from this scheme as much as they should. Especially since the EU is proposing that some of this money come in the form of loans rather than grants, which is not great for the poorest countries who are not in a position to pay it back.

What we need to see next is the EU pushing for a more money for adaptation and more innovative ways to bring in this climate cash, rather than pinching from the aid pot. 

However , it’s great to see the UK and EU take a leadership stance on climate finance, but we can’t be leaders if no one is following – so hopefully we’ll see more of a domino effect over the next few days and see the EU develop their proposals in the months ahead.

In short? Good but not good enough!


Campaign Win: Obiang prize SUSPENDED

Over the past 6 months my loyal Superbadger followers using my app on Facebook and iPhone have sent over 1500 emails to different UN employees.

The United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) created a prize for “scientific achievements” sponsored to the tune of $3million (£2million) by Teodoro Obiang, President of Equatorial Guinea.  Obiang has been accused of rigging elections, rights abuses and corruption by several human rights groups who have called for UNESCO to end their association with him.

Some of these emails went to the UNESCO board director, others to Executive Board members and they, alongside other campaigning organisations, have had an impact.

UNESCO HAS SUSPENDED THE OBIANG PRIZE.

This follows a postponement of the prize in June; my friends we should be greatly encouraged.

Thank you to all who took action, your voices were heard and have shown President Obiang and the world that we will not sit idly by in the face of corruption and poor governance.

If you would like to join the ranks of Superbadger users visit http://bit.ly/bxKS7s or download Superbadger from iPhone’s AppStore.

Comprehensive Spending Review Response

Today saw George Osborne set out exactly where, when and how the Coalition Government will reduce the budget deficit.

Among the many and various cuts Tearfund is pleased that the Government has listened to us and our supporters who have campaigned and prayed for the UK to maintain its commitment to increase investment to tackle global poverty.

This is clearly a moral obligation, especially at this time of global economic hardship, and we hope that the rest of the world will follow the UK’s lead.

In particular Tearfund is pleased that the Department for International Development (DfID) will lead the drive to tackle global poverty and will continue to be responsible for the majority of Overseas Development Assistance (ODA). We hope that the increased money for development will be spent effectively on issues like water and sanitation, HIV and giving people in developing countries an opportunity to participate in the decisions which affect them. We recognise that there is a particular challenge to support development in conflict-affected states but urge DfID not to forget those living in extreme poverty in other more peaceful parts of the world.

Climate change is already having devastating effects in some of the poorest parts of the world, and we welcome the UK’s drive to support low carbon growth and adaptation. If we do not take urgent action by committing additional long-term funding to help countries adapt to the effects of climate change, we could see vast areas of the world become uninhabitable within our lifetimes. The international development money committed through the Comprehensive Spending Review for tackling poverty is welcome but we must also find further funds to tackle climate change. The Government must now press for agreement on innovative sources like a Robin Hood Tax to raise more than $100bn internationally by 2020, in addition to overseas aid, for tackling climate change.

Following the Comprehensive Spending Review Tearfund is asking you to write to David Cameron through the Superbadger app, thanking him for protecting the aid budget and calling on George Osborne to not give up on finding long-term funding for climate change.

Click here to take action.

UNESC-Heaveho!

At the start of the summer we badgered the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) to stop them from awarding a prize funded by the corrupt dictator Teodoro Obiang, President of Equatorial Guinea.  Over 600 emails were sent challenging the ethics of this prize and UNESCO postponed the award (previous blog post).  Now there is a chance to cancel this prize completely.

The United States have put forward a resolution calling for the withdrawal of this lavish prize at the executive board meeting that is happening right now.

I have two badgers ready and waiting for you at  http://apps.facebook.com/superbadger one is to the US representative, David Kellion, encouraging him to stand strong and speak out against corruption, the other to the Ghanaian representative, Naana Opoku-Agyemang,

who has spoken out historically about slavery and human rights issues, but supports this prize.
Please take action now by clicking http://apps.facebook.com/superbadger and let’s give Obiang the UNESC-heaveho for good.
Superbadger